Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Switzerland Essays - Cantons Of Switzerland, Central Europe

Switzerland Switzerland is located in central Europe. Switzerland is also known as ?Confoederatio Helvetica?, therefore the abbreviation of CH. ?Confiederatio? stands for ?confereration?, ?Helvetica? derives for the Latin word ?Helvetier?, the name of the people who lived in the area which later became Switzerland. The capital of Switzerland is Bern, which was founded in 1191. Switzerland's independence and neutrality have long been honored by the major European powers and Switzerland did not participate in either World War I or II. Switzerland consists of 23 Cantons, or states, each with their individual legislative, executive and judicial authority. Each canton consists of a number of Bezirke, or districts, and within each district are a number of Gemeinden or municipalities. There are 2929 municipalities in Switzerland. A municipality with more than 10,000 citizens is considered a Stadt, or town, smaller municipalities are called Dorf, or village. However, some smaller villages have the status of a town for historical reasons. About two thirds of the area of Switzerland is covered with forests, lakes and mountains. Switzerland, in area, is sightly less than twice the size of New Jersey. Completely landlocked, Switzerland is bordered by France to it's east, Germany to it's north, Austria to it's west and finally Italy to the south. Since Switzerland has no mineral resources, it must import, process and resell them as products. Services are the most important part of the economy, which includes banking, assurances and tourism. Farming is also an important part of the economy. But the production of the Swiss farmers does not fulfill the needs of all the people, so Switzerland must rely on imported goods from other countries. The Swiss economy is divided into three sectors: agriculture, industry and services. Less the 10% of the population is employed in agriculture. This sector is strongly supported by the government. About 40% of the population are employed in industry. This sector includes machine and metal industry, watch industry and textile industry. All of them export much of the products to foreign countries and suffer a lot because of the expensive Swiss Franc. Finally, the service sector employees more than 50% of the population. Included in this sector are banking, assurances and tourism. Banking is one of the most important businesses in Switzerland. The population of Switzerland is about 7,275,467. Even though Switzerland is a small county, it's people speak no less than four different languages. Of the total population 65% speak German, 18% speak French, 12% speak Italian, 1% Romansch, and 4% other. The German speaking Swill don't speak the same German as the Germans or the Austrians do, but it is known as a Swiss-German. To make things even worse, each canton has its own dialect, but there is no written Swiss-German at all. Fortunately, the Germans, Austrians and the Swiss-Germans use the same written German language which in turn is close to the so called ?high German? language. Switzerland's government is a federal republic. The executive branch consists of the president, who is both the chief of state and the head of the government, and the vice president. Both the president and vice president are elected by the Federal Assembly from among the members of the Federal Council for one-year terms that run concurrently. The legislative branch consists of 200 representatives, know as the Federal Assembly, and members are elected by popular vote on a basis of proportional representation to serve four-years terms. The judicial branch is the Federal Supreme Court and the judges are elected for six-year terms by the Federal Assembly European History

Friday, March 6, 2020

Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl Essay Example

Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl Essay Example Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl Paper Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl Paper Essay Topic: Literature The question I have selected for my essay is number one and I will be discussing the presentation of gender and power explored in the short story, Lamb to the Slaughter by Roald Dahl. Also in my essay I will be explaining the roles played by the two main characters in the story Mary and Patrick Maloney. Mary Maloney is the main character in the story Lamb to the Slaughter. She is represented as a stereotypical housewife who adores her husband, Patrick Maloney, and is willing to go to any length to please him. At the start of the text Mary seems to be a eak woman and the weaker person in her marriage. She lets her husband push her around and she doesnt even realise hes doing it, because she only ever wants to make happy. Patrick Maloney is the husband of Mary Maloney and the dominant one in their relationship. In the text he is represented as a stereotypical ungrateful, grumpy husband. Also in the text the Maloneys would be classified as an upper class family but even though this is so, Patrick Maloney still works full time as a Senior Policeman. Another thing we notice about Mr. Maloney is he fact he seems quite bored of the fact he is waited on hand and foot by his wife. Power plays a major part in the story Lamb to the Slaughter. And in this story the power seems to reverse from one character to the other, as it starts of with all the power in the hands of Patrick Maloney. Him being the Senior Police officer at work tells us that he must hold quite a lot of power of his work mates below him. But obviously the person he holds the most power over in the text is his wife, Mary Maloney; his hard working housewife who we find out is 6 months pregnant. She is constantly fussing over Patrick wether it is cooking his dinner or getting his slippers. Another thing we notice is that Mr. Maloney is always the person who makes the decisions in their relationship. Wether it has very little or very much importance. For example what they were both going to have for dinner, it was always whatever Mr. Maloney felt like. However all of this power is reversed in the text when Mary comes back from getting the leg of lamb for her and her husbands dinner. She spots Patrick standing in the corner of the oom and he says, For gods sake! Dont make supper for me, Im going out. And that seems to set her off so she walks over and shows physical power as she hits her husband hard over the head with the leg of lamb, and the second he is dead a whole new power is left with her, it is the power Mr. Maloney had once held over her. Mary also seems to have power over the policeman, detectives and doctors who came to investigate the death of Mr. Maloney. They seem very sympathetic towards her and believe every word Mrs. Maloney says about the death of her usband. After studying this short story it would be fair to say that Mr/Mrs Maloney do not have stereotypical or specific gender and power roles as they seem change their characters during the text. Mr. Maloney is explained by Mary at the start of the story as a loving husband and turned out to be ungrateful and unloving. And Mrs. Maloney starts off being a shy, warm, quite woman and ends up slaughtering her husband with a leg of lamb. To conclude my essay however, at different times in the text both characters hold more power then the other.

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Written analysis of a qualitative research report to determine the Essay

Written analysis of a qualitative research report to determine the validity of the study - Essay Example effectiveness and implementation of these programs two actors are stated: the tight school schedule and differences in the opinions of the different stakeholders (teachers, parents, adolescents etc.) which is actually the subject of research in this study. However it is not stated and there is no reference to find if the main question analyzed in the study is formulated based on a previous research or based on a personal perception of the authors of the study. Authors state that the question they analyze in the study is â€Å"at least† one of the two factors that are barriers for implementing the current recommendations for reducing adolescent obesity, but nevertheless we don’t have information’s about the importance of this question based on a previous research. Nevertheless the literature listed as reference to the text is relevant and we have access to previous research and studies that were done on the subject of adolescent obesity specifically in Switzerland (Zimmermann et al. 2004). The problem with adolescent obesity is supported by well designed and relevant studies. Also the method of qualitative approach is stated as appropriate for the type of the research conducted in this study. This statement is also referenced with relevant publications which elaborate why this approach is most suited for this study (Krueger 1994) (Kitzinger 1995). Nevertheless we can’t understand the importance of the question analyzed in this study (different views and perceptions of all the stakeholders) based on the references stated in the study, but only as personal view of the researcher that this question is one of the most important in understanding the problem. There are studies however that imply the importance of integrated approach of all s takeholders in implementing programs for reducing adolescent obesity (Lynne et al. 2010). Medical educators and nurses working in the schools have important function in identifying the problem of adolescent obesity and

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Empowering People through Education Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Empowering People through Education - Essay Example Universal education has been on the global agenda since the 1948 Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed free and compulsory education to be a basic human right. The 1990 Convention on the Rights of the Child, signed by all but two of the world's governments, reaffirmed this right as a legally binding obligation. Since then, there have been many high-level international commitments to education for all (Bloom & Cohen, 2002). Indeed, education is a tool for human beings to push them to advance their goals in life. This is the reason why education was inculcated in the Declaration of Human Rights. This is also why, of all American institutions, the educational system has perhaps the greatest impact on the lives of ordinary people. Children gain knowledge about a standard range of subjects from English and history to mathematics and science. They also learn social skills and are exposed to different people and ideas. Educational achievement is the single largest influence on an individual's future earning power. More than anything else, in fact, it is education that shapes a person's future. Professor Stephen Heyneman of Vanderbilt University, in his article "Are We Our Brothers' Keeper", pointed out that that economic development depends on educational progress. The evidence supporting this claim emerged from multiple sources and common intuitive judgment: nations with an educated population are economically adaptable, healthy, and innovative. But the challenges to providing education in low-income countries are daunting. Generally, they can be divided into three categories: schooling's access, quality, and purpose. This is why world leaders are thinking how greater educational opportunity can be provided to low-income countries, how the quality of that opportunity can be improved, and how the international community should guide these schools to reduce extremist nationalist and religious curricula (The World and I, 2003, p. 18). So if "ignorance is bliss", why do we still pursue to educate ourselves and our children It may be true, but no individual wants to become ignorant. If a person is not educated, he or she is susceptible to being taken advantage of. Holmes (1981) offered a more viable answer to this question by expounding the aims of education. According to Holmes (1981), these aims are often expressed in general terms in order to induce widespread public appeal. Aims such as the holistic development of children and the acquisition of skills and knowledge deemed desirable for societal well-being are often palatable to a variety of stakeholders, including governments, businesses, parents, educators, and students (Holmes, 1981). Thus, the intentions of education, as Holmes has argued, are often described in terms of their intrinsic value (knowledge for knowledge's sake), their social value (process of initiation into acceptable social standards), and their intended outcomes (all-around individual devel opment). The aims of education, therefore, represent a society's idealized hopes and visions for its citizens: In so far as aims are statements of what "ought to be the case" and represent man's hopes and aspirations not only for himself but for future generations, they are part of our socially constructed world and can be accepted or rejected according to taste. (p. 114) Thus, the aims of educa

Sunday, January 26, 2020

Terrorism Represents The Most Significant Threat Criminology Essay

Terrorism Represents The Most Significant Threat Criminology Essay To start with, Terrorism is not a new phenomenon; it was first used in the 18th century during French Revolution, but its definition is still a subject of debate in the international bodies. The term Terrorism has been defined differently by different people, governmental, non-governmental and international organisations in the field of international relations and beyond. Within the United States of America Terrorism is defined differently, taking some examples, The United States Department of Defence defines terrorism as the calculated use of unlawful violence or threat of unlawful violence to inculcate fear; intended to coerce or to intimidate governments or societies in the pursuit of goals that are generally political, religious, or ideological.  [2]  However The FBI uses a different definition as: Terrorism is the unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives.  [3]   Outside the United States, there are greater variations in other features of terrorism; United Nations defines Terrorism in 1992 as; An anxiety-inspiring method of repeated violent actions, employed by (semi-) clandestine individuals, groups or state actors, for idiosyncratic, criminal or political reasons, whereby in contrast to assassination the direct targets of violence are not the main targets.  [4]   The Key legal definition of terrorism in the UK legislation is contained in the Terrorism Act (2000); In this Act terrorism means the use or threat of action where- (a) The action falls within subsection (b) The use or threat is designed to influence the government or an International governmental organisation or to intimidate the public Or a section of the public, and (c) The use or threat is made for the purpose of advancing a political, religious or ideological cause.  [5]   One of the most comprehensive and solid studies of modern terrorism required more than a hundred pages to survey and compare the various definitions.  [6]  Walter Laqueur, as frustrated with the proliferation of the definition of terrorism concludes that any definition of political terrorism venturing beyond noting the systematic use of murder, injury and destruction or threats of such acts towards achieving political ends is bound to lead to endless controversy. As a result it can be predicted with confidence that the arguments about a comprehensive and detailed definition of terrorism will continue for a long time that they will not result in an agreement and that they will make no notable contribution towards the understanding of terrorism.  [7]   Sometimes it might be just easy to generalize terrorist groups, whereas at other times it is important to recognize significant differences because they can be critical for shaping policy responses. In the sense that they have all engaged in acts that meet most definition of terrorism. The Irish Republican Army (IRA), and Al-Qaeda, can all be considered terrorist organisations. Whereas, they are very different in terms of their motives, goals and objectives, as well as the attacks committed. The IRA can be viewed as a traditional terrorist in the sense that they involve in small scale bombings, they also tend to calibrate their use of violence, using enough to rivet world attention but not much as to alienate supporters abroad.  [8]   Al-Qaeda on the other hand, has much more open political and religious goals and is motivated by a particular form of religious fundamentalism; its tactics and the scale of attacks are in a very different level with the IRA. Although terrorism is not a new thing but the September 11 attack suggests that the world will be dealing with something very different, September 11 is very different type terrorism from what the world is used to. It is particularly significant because religious motivated organisations have been increasing in number since the 1980s. According to Hoffman, only two of the sixty-four groups active in 1980s, could be classified as predominantly religious in character. The majority of terrorist groups were nationalist and ethnic in nature, but by 1995, however religious groups are nearly half of the sixty-four known in the 1980s.  [9]   In addition to the organisations that fuse fundamentalist religious doctrine with political aims, there are also groups like the Aum Shinrikyo in Japan, that conduct a Sarin Nerve gas attack or the Tokyo subway in March, 1995, killing twelve people and taking as many as 5000 to the hospital.  [10]  Generalisation of terrorist or terrorism organisations can sometimes be complicated, because recognising their motives can make it easier to respond its problems. Terrorism is posing severe threats to the whole array of securities. Threats now come from far end not just from neighbouring states. The world today is faced with the problem of the proliferation of nuclear weapons by different states, which has a lot of threat to the international security. The Bombing of the American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998 demonstrates that terrorism is and will remain a central threat to international security as the 21st century has approached. Bombs are the most common form of weapons used by terrorists groups around the world. Many experts fear that terrorists will ultimately resort to weapon of mass destruction terrorism, because they talk about it lot and videos and training manuals that deals with Weapon of Mass Destruction, have been seized from their training camps.  [11]  However researchers who had an interview with imprisoned terrorists found that the terrorists are not interested in Weapon of Mass Destruction.  [12]   Terrorism is seen as the unpredictable mix of threats in todays International security; some see terrorism as the fundamental security threat of the 21st Century, while others argue that it is a minor stress compared to greater threat of global warming or other fatal diseases. Still some group of people argue that terrorist violence is insignificant compared to daily travel accidents in many developed countries.  [13]   Terrorism affects the foreign policy of many nations. A huge number of lives have been destroyed, and material goods worth billions also destroyed. People live in continuous fear of insecurity, because they do not know the next turn of events, or where it would take place.  [14]  International terrorism continues to pose difficult challenges to the world and human security in the international system. Apart from the fear of insecurity terrorism brings about, it also reflects in economic decline, and unemployment, it brings about poverty and a general sense of frustration amongst the victims of terrorism.  [15]   Although the total number of terrorists incidents has declined worldwide in the 1990s, the percentage of terrorist incidents resulting to fatalities has nonetheless increased. According to the (Research and development) RAND-St. Andrews Chronology of International Terrorism, the number of terrorist attacks has declined in the late 1990s.  [16]   Table 1 Source: RAND, RAND Database of Worldwide Terrorism Incidents, at: http://www.rand.org/nsrd/projects/terrorism-incidents/ Table 2. List of Significant Terrorist Attacks from 2001-2009  [17]   Year Attack Fatalities/Injuries Luanda, Angola 10 Aug 2001 Attack on train 152 146 United States of America 11 Sep 2001 crashing of hijacked planes into World Trade, Centre Pentagon and site in Pennsylvania 2,993 8,900 Kuta, Indonesia 12 Oct 2002 car bombing outside nightclub 202 350 Madrid, Spain 11 Mar 2004 Bombings of 4 trains 191 1,876 Kadhimiya and Karbala, Iraq 2 Mar 2004 multiple suicide bombings at shrines 188 430 Uganda 21 Feb 2004 Armed attack and arson at refugee camp 239 60 Baghdad, Iraq 14 Sep 2005 Multiple suicide bombings and shooting attacks 182 679 Hilla, Iraq 28 Feb 2005 Car bombing outside medical clinic 135 130 Baghdad, Iraq 23 Nov 2006 Multiple car bombings 202 250 Mumbai, India 11 Jul 2006 multiple bombings on commuter trains 200 714 Baghdad, Iraq 18 Apr 2007 multiple bombings 193 197 Armili, Iraq 7 Jul 2007 multiple suicide truck bombings 182 270 Al-Qataniyah and Al-Adnaniyah, Iraq 14 Aug 2007 multiple car bombings 520 1,500 Hilla, Iraq 6 Mar 2007 two suicide bombings and additional attacks 137 310 Luanda, Angola 10 Aug 2001 attack on train 152 146 Mumbai, India 26-29 Nov 2008 multiple shooting and grenade attacks and hostage takings 370 includes 9 terrorists killed Peshawar, Pakistan 28 Oct 2009 bombing at marketplace 118 200 Baghdad, Iraq 25 Oct 2009 two vehicle bombings at government buildings 155 540 Baghdad, Iraq 8 Dec 2009 five car bombings 127 448 Sources: Shimko Keith. International Relations, Perspectives and Controversies (USA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2008). RAND, RAND Database of Worldwide Terrorism Incidents, at: http://www.rand.org/nsrd/projects/terrorism-incidents/ From the table above, it shows clearly how Terrorism is posing significant threat to innocent civilians around the world, killing hundreds and thousand of innocent people; the New terrorism of the Al Qaeda network has entirely replaced the Old terrorist regimes and movements of the last 3 decades, by far the most worrying and significant trend in terrorism globally is the increase in lethality and towards indiscriminate attacks in public places. World terror represents a true modern epidemic that threatens the very survival of the free world. This shows that terrorism is the most significant threat in International Relations today.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

India Superpower Essay

It has been more than 60 years since India got its independence and a lot has changed. Radios have been replaced by LCDs, tongas have been replaced by autos and busses and matkas have been replaced by refrigerators. Indian Companies have made it to the word stage. Companies like TATA own few of the most premium brands of the world such as Jaguar on one hand while the world’s cheapest car ‘Nano’ on the other. Indians hold very high posts all over the world be it Obama’s cabinet, United Nations or the World Bank. India has highest youth population. Our India also has one of the largest army in the world which is capable of facing any other superpower in the world. There is a growth in the infrastructure too. Metro has made short distance travelling comfortable and easier. But is it really a superpower? We have second largest population in the world, but there are very few companies having interaction presence. There is deep-rooted corruption. Most of the politicians are involved in scams like Common Wealth Games scam, 2G scam, Coal scam and even fodder scam. The people of India have got used to corruption. We also have highest youth population, but what is the use when there is no proper social infrastructure to provide them with the skills? There is no proper system to retain the cream brains in our country. The top brains are handpicked by western countries. Who is at a loss? Its India. We also have a huge army but due to lack of focus on research and development we are dependent on Israel, Russia and France for our weaponries. There is no proper policy framework to stop the growth of population. It is no brainer whether India is a superpower or not . If there is corruption in India, India cannot have a good future. Only a strong policy framework and long sited vision can make it possible and India will again be called the golden bird.

Friday, January 10, 2020

Black Men and Public Space

Dylan Cruz English12/23/11Black Men and Public Space In ?Black Men and Public Space? , Brent Staples writes about how he was treateddifferently at various times due to being African  ± American. Staples uses exposition to helpshow the various times where people acted differently when they saw him all due to his race. From confrontations on the street to being confused for a robber as he was rushing to hand in anarticle for a magazine, it is clear that he is treated unfairly. Staples uses cause and effect to showhow he does things differently now, hoping that people may see him in another light.He alsocompares and contrasts how some situations would be different if he were of a different race. Histone and diction throughout the work is also interesting, as he does not seem angry about how heis being treated. Staples lists many examples throughout ? Black Men and Public Space? where he has  been treated differently because of his race. When Brent had some down time, he decided to g ointo a jewelry store. ?The proprietor excused herself and returned with an enormous redDoberman pinscher straining at the end of a leash.?This is an excellent example of being treateddifferently. If any other person had gone in there the owner would not have reacted in the shedid. Another example he uses is when he first begins to notice that people see him differently. Hewas in college on walking on the streets late at night when he sees a woman walking in theopposite direction as he. ?It was clear that she thought herself the quarry of a mugger, a rapist, or  worse.? These examples Staples brings forward clearly show that he is treated unfairly just  because of his skin color.Staples also uses other rhetorical strategies throughout his work, including cause andeffect and as well as comparing and contrasting. After seeing all the situations in which he isunfairly judged, he begins to do things hoping people will see past his skin color. He writes, ? Inow take precautions to ma ke myself less threatening.? Now when he's walking around a night,he whistles Beethoven and Vivaldi tunes, stating ? Virtually everybody seems to sense that amugger wouldn't be warbling bright, sunny selections from Vivaldi'sFour Seasons ?. Staplesalso compares and contrasts some situations, like how people treat him differently if they see himin business clothes versus seeing him in casual attire. The tone Staples uses in this work is very interesting. Even though he has been constantly  judged by the color of his skin, he doesn't seem very angry about it. The tone in this is verystraightforward and to the point. This may be because he's realized that people are going to  judge him, and he can't do anything about it and just accept it.Also, it's happened to him on somany occasions that he has gotten used to it now. The diction he uses helps prove his point thathe's not a bad person, as I don't believe any muggers would use the wide vocabulary Staplesuses throughout his work. Ev en though Brent Staples gets judged just due to his skin color, it doesn't seem bother  him all that much. He's able to see that it's not him that scares people; it's the stereotype that hisrace has attached to them. Through the use of examples and his unique tone, he is able to conveythis message in his writing. Black Men and Public Space In his essay, â€Å"Black Men and Public Space, Brent Staples expresses his experiences, struggles and discoveries of being a African American man of great stature in America in the 1970’s. His appearance alone—a dark looming figure—sparks a subconscious fear for an ordinary man. Typical citizens only see in black and white thus their eyes cannot distinguish between Staples and a criminal who prowls the streets with the same features. Describing his own character as a courteous and harmless person, clashes with the views of those around him that possess negative stereotypes towards black men. His reverse relationship with Caucasian people make it seem that a white person’s fear is not as strong as the discrimination Staples encounters in his day-to-day life, making him the victim, not the culprit. Being in these situations initiates a response from Staples in order to intimidate people less. Staples, in this reading, tries to make his readers live in his shoes and acknowledge the fact not all black men are the ones that automatically appear in their mind. Sometimes the fear of stereotypes attributes more to the action and reaction to people, more so than their general logic. We might believe that issues of race and gender is not present in this time and age but it still remains maybe in stronger than in the past. Although we consider America to be an egalitarian society, it is far from it. While we wish to live in a society where stereotypes are non-existent and men are all treated equal, we as human have it in our nature Black Men and Public Space Cesar Augusto Gonzalez Professor Hargett English 1101 October 14, 2010 Vicious Cycle Throughout history, literature has served as a way of expression. Human beings have poured out their feelings onto paper, as long as there have been people interested in them. Common themes have risen through the ages, such as the contrast between light and dark. Darkness is known for its negative undertone. In earlier times, we saw darkness as an interpretation of evil; likewise, light represented God and all good.From literature we, as a society, have built what later became social rules, giving rise to things such as prejudice. In Brent Staples essay â€Å"Black Men and Public Space† this is clearly shown by the authors own experiences of antipathy and hostility towards him caused by his own self. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, Brent Staples begins by coming to the realization of the way he’d be viewed for the rest of his life. He describes feelings of uneasiness toward s his newfound self-image. It all came to him one evening in an ally where his tall frame walked behind a young woman.She proceeded to perceive him as a threat to her safety even her life, and race off into the night. Later on his –problem- took a deeper hit on him when even as a professional this image continued to follow him. It evolved into harm for himself when he is mistaken for a thief several times. Toward the end the author learns how to manage this issue by cleaning his image, and controlling his rage toward the ones who considered a criminal. Consistent rejection can cause a man –or woman to see the world as of one color or the other, to the extremes.Thus creating a situation of self-blame where one might think and accept that every bad incident its their own fault. He is blaming himself for actions that occur without actual intent of the so-called attacker. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space,† Staples writes, â€Å"My first victim was a woman† (566). This phrase creates a dark tone that only gets clearer as the essay moves on. The image of – the victim- is passed onto the author itself. And the fact that is proclaiming himself as an aggressor indicates that he has acknowledged this as a reality.In today’s society, people have the tendency to change how they –act and react- toward certain groups of people, places of interaction, friends and strangers. It can range from lowering safety standards when ones home, to the point of running from someone that, by mistake, its portrayed and related to something harmful. This can create a unique experience, most of the time being of uneasiness and stress. Staples write, â€Å"I First began to know the unwieldy inheritance I’d come into- the ability to alter public space in an ugly way† (566).It is clearly stated in the previews quote that the author is now experimenting a new way of social awareness that it’s brought upon him by just being that way he is. It is surprising how fast people tend to judge yet it also can be way of protection. Even though the author might not be the real aggressor that does not takes the fact that another man like him could be the authentic one. Today’s civilization has grown with fear. Fear of loosing what’s theirs, fear of the police, fear of politics, fear of what’s unknown and different.Sometimes this can manifest in avoidance of the subject but in some occasions it can be a little more –active-. Staples writes, â€Å"And I soon gathered that being perceived as dangerous it’s a hazard in itself† (567). As a result of his dangerous association the author realizes that it’s unsafe to be outside too. As some women tend to opt just to sprint away from you, some men might choose to fight the problem. This brings concerns to the author who apart form being socially un-welcome is now threatened by his own naturally built image. Fear is accompan ied by a need for survival.Some animals grow being dominant, creating fear to control. Other just decide to hide hoping not to be involved into precarious situations. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, Staples describes, â€Å"I chose, perhaps unconsciously, to remain a shadow – timid, but a survivor† (568). Staples explain that he took the –smaller animal- path and tries to remain un-recognizable in order for him to have a safer journey around avoiding confrontation. Is easier to hide that to fight but in the long run that –easiness- brings other problems, where self-blame can evolve to depression and self-depreciation.It comes a time in every man’s life when he has to choose between himself and society. When he has to decide whether to stand on his own or simply hide his true self in order to escape confrontation, arguments and possible rejection. Most people have a tendency to – go with the flow- be just like everyone else. Stap le writes, â€Å"I now take precautions to make myself less threatening† (568). This quote describes the idea previously expressed. He chooses to alter his image to make his journey safer. In order to add this newer safer self, he must subtract what he was before, losing his identity.In Staples essay â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, big issues are explored and described in a way that we can relate to without getting lost in the context. On a narrow sense the essay can be viewed as how the author goes through the realization of how he is pictured, moving to the changes he has to make to be -socially- less threatening. Doing this one can go a process of depression and losing identity. This is just the example of only one person but this case is not reserved to him only, it happens to almost everyone and in many different levels.We are 6,602,224,175 humans suffering form all kind of unreal and unfair treatment and as a result, hate and resentment are created, and in fac t they are he main cause of racism and un fair treatment towards others thus creating a vicious cycle from which we need to get out in order for humans to walk though these crowded streets in harmony. Work Cited Brent Staples. â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†. Four in One: Rhetoric, Reader, Research Guide, and Handbook. Eds. Eduard A. Dornan and Robert Dees. 5th Edition. Boston: Longman, 2011. 167-169. Print Black Men and Public Space Cesar Augusto Gonzalez Professor Hargett English 1101 October 14, 2010 Vicious Cycle Throughout history, literature has served as a way of expression. Human beings have poured out their feelings onto paper, as long as there have been people interested in them. Common themes have risen through the ages, such as the contrast between light and dark. Darkness is known for its negative undertone. In earlier times, we saw darkness as an interpretation of evil; likewise, light represented God and all good.From literature we, as a society, have built what later became social rules, giving rise to things such as prejudice. In Brent Staples essay â€Å"Black Men and Public Space† this is clearly shown by the authors own experiences of antipathy and hostility towards him caused by his own self. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, Brent Staples begins by coming to the realization of the way he’d be viewed for the rest of his life. He describes feelings of uneasiness toward s his newfound self-image. It all came to him one evening in an ally where his tall frame walked behind a young woman.She proceeded to perceive him as a threat to her safety even her life, and race off into the night. Later on his –problem- took a deeper hit on him when even as a professional this image continued to follow him. It evolved into harm for himself when he is mistaken for a thief several times. Toward the end the author learns how to manage this issue by cleaning his image, and controlling his rage toward the ones who considered a criminal. Consistent rejection can cause a man –or woman to see the world as of one color or the other, to the extremes.Thus creating a situation of self-blame where one might think and accept that every bad incident its their own fault. He is blaming himself for actions that occur without actual intent of the so-called attacker. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space,† Staples writes, â€Å"My first victim was a woman† (566). This phrase creates a dark tone that only gets clearer as the essay moves on. The image of – the victim- is passed onto the author itself. And the fact that is proclaiming himself as an aggressor indicates that he has acknowledged this as a reality.In today’s society, people have the tendency to change how they –act and react- toward certain groups of people, places of interaction, friends and strangers. It can range from lowering safety standards when ones home, to the point of running from someone that, by mistake, its portrayed and related to something harmful. This can create a unique experience, most of the time being of uneasiness and stress. Staples write, â€Å"I First began to know the unwieldy inheritance I’d come into- the ability to alter public space in an ugly way† (566).It is clearly stated in the previews quote that the author is now experimenting a new way of social awareness that it’s brought upon him by just being that way he is. It is surprising how fast people tend to judge yet it also can be way of protection. Even though the author might not be the real aggressor that does not takes the fact that another man like him could be the authentic one. Today’s civilization has grown with fear. Fear of loosing what’s theirs, fear of the police, fear of politics, fear of what’s unknown and different.Sometimes this can manifest in avoidance of the subject but in some occasions it can be a little more –active-. Staples writes, â€Å"And I soon gathered that being perceived as dangerous it’s a hazard in itself† (567). As a result of his dangerous association the author realizes that it’s unsafe to be outside too. As some women tend to opt just to sprint away from you, some men might choose to fight the problem. This brings concerns to the author who apart form being socially un-welcome is now threatened by his own naturally built image. Fear is accompan ied by a need for survival.Some animals grow being dominant, creating fear to control. Other just decide to hide hoping not to be involved into precarious situations. In â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, Staples describes, â€Å"I chose, perhaps unconsciously, to remain a shadow – timid, but a survivor† (568). Staples explain that he took the –smaller animal- path and tries to remain un-recognizable in order for him to have a safer journey around avoiding confrontation. Is easier to hide that to fight but in the long run that –easiness- brings other problems, where self-blame can evolve to depression and self-depreciation.It comes a time in every man’s life when he has to choose between himself and society. When he has to decide whether to stand on his own or simply hide his true self in order to escape confrontation, arguments and possible rejection. Most people have a tendency to – go with the flow- be just like everyone else. Stap le writes, â€Å"I now take precautions to make myself less threatening† (568). This quote describes the idea previously expressed. He chooses to alter his image to make his journey safer. In order to add this newer safer self, he must subtract what he was before, losing his identity.In Staples essay â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†, big issues are explored and described in a way that we can relate to without getting lost in the context. On a narrow sense the essay can be viewed as how the author goes through the realization of how he is pictured, moving to the changes he has to make to be -socially- less threatening. Doing this one can go a process of depression and losing identity. This is just the example of only one person but this case is not reserved to him only, it happens to almost everyone and in many different levels.We are 6,602,224,175 humans suffering form all kind of unreal and unfair treatment and as a result, hate and resentment are created, and in fac t they are he main cause of racism and un fair treatment towards others thus creating a vicious cycle from which we need to get out in order for humans to walk though these crowded streets in harmony. Work Cited Brent Staples. â€Å"Black Men and Public Space†. Four in One: Rhetoric, Reader, Research Guide, and Handbook. Eds. Eduard A. Dornan and Robert Dees. 5th Edition. Boston: Longman, 2011. 167-169. Print